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said we cannot rest and be satisfied as long as black folk in mississippi could not vote. and those in new york believed that they had nothing for which to vote. today the united states supreme court, having recently eviscerating the voting rights act and with numerous states clamoring to legislatively codify voting suppression measures, not only must we not be satisfied but we must fight back boldly. too many of our unknown heroes and she ros fought, bled and died for us to have the precious rights of vote. for us to now sit back and timidly allow our franchise to be taken away or diminished, we must not rest until the congress of the united states restores the voting rights act protections discard bid a supreme court blind to the blatant tests of the black folks. paramount to martin luther king jr.'s fervent dream was the commitment that african americans gain full economic opportunity and not be confined to basic mobility forward from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. today, with 12% unemployment rates in the african american community and 38% of all children of color in this cou
to have anita thompson here, from mississippi, because 48 years ago, there were drive-by shootings at headstart programs in her state, and some toloyers were threatening not send their children to headstart. we have come some way, and we have a ways to go. and earlyeadstart childhood education programs were serving a scant 40% of all eligible children. waiting lists or long. -- were long. rising fixed costs and rent, energy. we have almost always operated at the margins because it seems inconceivably -- inconceivable not to spend every available dollar on providing the best quality program for every possible child. when the unthinkable happened and sequestration became the new reality this march, we had little left to cut. you recently saw -- you have likely seen the recent report that over 57,000 fewer children will be served in head start and early head start next year because of the sequester. this is not a small number. numbercrunching thinkers in our team figured out that 57,000 people would fill a football stadium at the university of louisville. they would fill 1900 school m
jackson mississippi, good morning. yes, i am a conservative republican from mississippi. i agree with the doctor earlier. i think obamacare is very bad. it is going to go down naturally. i am not for a government shutdown i am for tying it to and doing asing the conservative republicans will done. i think we ought to way entitlements and electric public and in 2014. i am not for a government shutdown and i am not for obamacare. i am tying it to the debt ceiling. host: that is the strategy as far as speaker boehner is concerned. caller: i think that is what we should do. eastern and central time zones and mountain pacific time zones are the options. the numbers are on your screen, you can call the one that best represents you. for and worth -- foreign affairs released a story in the washington post this morning, talking about a reunion of families on both sides in korea -- calls, this is john from idaho, good morning. i believe that republicans are missing an opportunity right now to win if wehe government and make president obama passed the health care and not give people voucher
was not mentioned. even though in mississippi where i was working, only 3% of the black people were registered. 40% of the population and incidentally, because of our work and working with other people, mississippi had the largest number of elected officials, but now, we're here 50 years later and we find in washington that more than in 1953. more people out of work, but more importantly, we went free in 1963. we need state hood. state hood. >> better jobs, better pay was an objective in 1963. a long time before voting rights legislation would come about, but many are crediting the march to having to expedite that, so what are you hoping comes after this 50-year mark of this march? the march did sort of spur us on and lighten our spirit, but we went to work the next week in mississippi and alabama and georgia, et cetera, so what i hope this march will do is let us know the struggle is not over. there's still massive discrimination, unemployment, gaps between the white and black students and it would spur us on to stop being so complacent, but from my point in washington, state hood is my number on
of us were arrested and jailed in mississippi during the freedom ride. a bus was set on fire in alabama. we were beaten and arrested and jailed, but we helped bring them in to segregation in public transportation. i came back here again in june of 196 1963 as the new chairmanf the student non-violent committee. we met with president kennedy, who said the frustration throughout america. in 1963 we cannot because of the color of our skin. we had t to pay a tax, pass a tt because of the color of our skin and pass a vote in jelly beans in a jar. thousand of people were arrested trying to participate in the integration process. many innocent were killed in mississippi, and that's why we told president kennedy we intended to march on washington to demonstrate the need for equal justice and equal opportunity in america. on august 28, 1963, the nation's capitol was in a state of emergency. thousands of troops surroundedded this city, little stores were closed, but the march was so orderly, so peaceful it was filled with dignity and self-respect because we believe in a way of peace, the way of l
carolina, north carolina, texas, mississippi, colorado. i don't know, pretty red states. unfriendliest, new jersey, california, michigan. >> liberal, liberal. >> go to mississippi for vacation. >> oakland is a beautiful city that is rotten. it is rotten because of liberal policy. >> i want to agree with my colleague here from wherever he is from. you are right. if you look at just the crime rates i would bet you the crime rates up against you would find a direct correlation. >> and economic freedom. if you look at a person's ability to start a business and sustain. if you go to places like in the top ten you will have that opportunity plus i think the weather is great in sonoma, california. >> the weather is great in oakland. >> it is because it is unfriendly. >> right to work states. no taxation. >> that's what they stop and think about because they are happier. they don't pay taxes. they don't have to pay union dues. >> can you blame detroit for being unfriendly? >> i wouldn't want there to be a city. >> i wouldn't want to live there. also, albany has the state government of new york. so
, and areas that are in mississippi and alabama, as much as six to ten inches of rain over the next five days, enough to cause flooding concerns. mara's already complained offair but it's a chilly morning in the northeast and the great lakes. >> it's like fall. i have my sweater under the desk, it's chilly. >> 24 hours ago i opened the windows in my house and last night i had to shut them. >> some people love it, but i say let summer run its course. >>> prince william prepares caring for his newborn to military duty. >>> who are the highest players in the nfl this year? >>> and a new study that shows which drivers are jerks. right now, 7 years of music is being streamed. a quarter million tweeters are tweeting. and 900 million dollars are changing hands online. that's why hp built a new kind of server. one that's 80% smaller. uses 89% less energy. and costs 77% less. it's called hp moonshot. and it's giving the internet the room it needs to grow. this&is gonna be big. hp moonshot. it's time to build a better enterprise. together. cheryl burke is cha-cha-ing in depend silhouette briefs for ch
on the other side of the country this evening, images from mississippi here. trucks right there going straight through the water. and from panama city, florida, images coming in. apartment complex there, just completely under water. these totals are really something. >> in gulfport, mississippi, they've had six inches in two hours. and it's not over. i wish this thing would move, but the front is sitting right there. this goes through wednesday. you're going to have although two to three inches, if you are anywhere from mobile, in through southern parts of alabama there, into the panhandle of florida. and atlanta gets back into that surge of moisture. they've seen way too much rain. not only this month, but this year and there's more to come as we go through the week. >> all right, ginger zee, thank you. >>> now, to the spike in bear attacks we told you about last night re. this is the time of year when they start preparing for hibernation, looki for food. tonight here, the 12-year-old girl attacked in michigan, describing the horror for the first time. here's abc's linzie janis now. >> report
. and then mississippi burning. wait until you hear hal scarpa senior is the gatt this of the mississippi burning portrayed in that movie which they happen. scarpa see at various nicknames. they call them the killing machine. he reveled in this. he felt that he had a license to kill. he would sign notes cayenne, killing machine. they called him the grim reaper, hannibal lector, the mad hatter. he had various names. he stopped counting after 50 murders, which makes him the most prolific killer in the history of cosa nostra, bar none and it makes him one of the top zero colors of all time, by the way. anyway, he only did 30 days in 30 years in prison. why? because from 1962 forward he was the top echelon criminal informants for the fbi. his briefing memos went directly to j. edgar hoover himself. over the years three separate organized crime strike forces, one in newark, one in chicago, one in brooklyn tried to put them away. could people are trying to get this mad dog killer of the street. other members of the fbi you are protecting him and keeping it on the street. these are a couple of the homic
on to help a student at howard and quote came out for students to go to mississippi because of the work that was going on there. i had seen some -- i had attended a deposition in washington and folk from mississippi and things they had suffered. this elderly man, hartman, talked about what happened on the bus. i was a student. all of the students were coming from all over the country. i was the black student and the student leadership at howard said we have to get there and be there with others. so i went to mississippi that summer of 1964 and i lived with a family. ms.johnson, her daughter was a teenager, june johnson and had been beaten in wynonna, mississippi. june was a strong girl. the family was strong there were about 12 children in the family. they took in three of us. two white girls and myself. host: ruth thanks for the call and thank you for sharing your story from 50 years ago. owen ullmann, we talked about your own participation. walk us through how you arrived here and why you came? guest: my parent has raised me and i'm proud of their values of stressing the importance
, who recently had some heart treatment. let's go to mississippi. laura from ocean springs, mississippi. i am 45 years old. when barack obama talked about education. they discussed how blacks and whites could not go to the same school. thes a graduate from university of south alabama. i was able to graduate from there with a bachelors. >> what did you get your degree in? >> i got my degree in exercise science. work on atrying to masters, but i have been sick. i will have surgery in september. i will try to finish up with a masters in education. >> good luck to you, thank you for joining us. florida, next up. >> how are you doing? listen, i wanted to commend you guys and congratulate you for an awesome broadcast. such a remarkable speech by such a remarkable character. encourage.mber to some of the members of congress commenting about the days activities. here here is senator casey from pennsylvania. this is kay granger of texas. what dreams do you have for your country? the culmination of a movement that began here in montgomery 50 years before. here is california, good evening, stephen
in mississippi. there was a fear that somebody would get the idea the connecticut of the players. because in some ways these players were civil rights workers. in so most of the players, including the rights players, did not deal very much with the community at large. there really didn't. there were there to play ball. there were not big thinkers. maybe one of them once. >> did you happen to see the jackie robinson from an 42? >> i like to the lot, and i would probably be the most cynical of all. >> i was curious about it because he said the manager brought these guys and because it was a financial decision, a business decision. that was the same theme from 42. analysts is curious about the. seventeen years had passed. was is still a financial thing really or was it just -- >> row, what he said it was -- he had been dead for 20 years, so i did not get to interview him. he did not need the money personally. he was more of the richest as in town. he made in the timber industry. i don't think personally it would be doing something that was right. he loved baseball. a but being a baseball player at t
louisiana's northeast border near mississippi. alina, what you can tell us? >> reporter: zoraida, this is still a very active scene. we're going to zoom into the bank so you can see the police remain here. investigators continue to comb the bank for vefd. now louisiana state police have identified the alleged hostage-taker as 20-year-old fuaed abdo ahmed. authorities say ahmed walked into this tensas state bank with a gun and took three employees hostage-over the course of 12 you hours, ahmed made several demands, even leased a female hostage. just before midnight, local time, a s.w.a.t. team stormed the bank because the gunman, according to police, threatened to kill the hostages. ahmed was shot dead. police say he shot dead both hostages before he was killed. the man and women were taken to separate hospitals in the area. at last check, according to police, they are listed in critical condition, zoraida. >> alina, thank you very much. we'll continue to check in with you there. >>> we're going to turn now to cairo, we have majoring troubling developments overnight. police have m
the speech but the flow of blood -- couldn't make the march. because she was in jail in mississippi when the sheriff told the -- they beat her unconscious. she couldn't make the march. james couldn't make the march. he was in jail. the day of the march the people were in jail. and so i'm anxious for us to make a appropriation legislation event not just reflection and motivation. i'm already motivated. we are -- that's why you came here now. let me say reverend jackson. here is what reverend jacksons wants you to do. we need some money. we are having a reception next door. we knew we put together. we didn't get no sponsor. we need some support. i hope in all of our givings let us sustain ourselves. something we should ask people -- [inaudible] sometimes we can't fight if the people got the fight on the right -- [inaudible] am i right about that? >> yes. >> you wouldn't like to give $100 would you stand. we need the money real bad. >> you would give at least $100. stand. this is not personal. pay your way. >> pay your way. >> credit card, food stamps. stand up. stand up. keep standing. now
in mississippi could not vote and those in new york believed that they had nothing for which to vote. today the united states supreme court having recently eviscerating the voting rights act and with numerous states clamoring to legislative codify voting suppression measures, not only must we not be satisfied, but we must fight back boldly. too many of our unknown heroes and sheroes fought for us to have the precious right for us to vote for us to sit back and timidly allow our franchise to be taken away or diminished. we must not rest until the congress of the united states restores the voting rights acted protections discarded by a supreme court blind to the blatant theft of the black vote. paramount to martin luther king junior's fervent dream was the commitment that african-americans gained full economic opportunity and not be confined to basic mobility from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. today with 12% unemployment rates in the african-american community and 38% of all children of color in this country living below the level of poverty, we know the dream is far from being realized.
every hill and molehill of mississippi and from every mountain side. . i'm angela, and i didn't think i could quit smoking but chantix helped me do it. i told my doctor i think i'm... i'm ready. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix (varenicline) is proven to help people quit smoking. it reduces the urge to smoke. i knew that i could smoke for the first 7 days. i knew that i wasn't putting nicotine back into my body to try to quit. [ male announcer ] some people had changes in behavior, thinking or mood, hostility, agitation, depressed mood and suicidal thoughts or actions while taking or after stopping chantix. if you notice any of these, stop chantix and call your doctor right away. tell your doctor about any history of mental health problems, which could get worse while taking chantix. don't take chantix if you've had a serious allergic or skin reaction to it. if you develop these, sp chantix and see your doctor right away as some can be life-threatening. tell your doctor if you have a history of heart or blood vessel problems, or if you develop new or worse symptoms. get me
rather have a brand new state of the art pipeline traveling down the margin mississippi and on the trunk to be cut tanker cars and trucks. >> host: there was a story that was reported by the newspaper saying that the decision would likely be until the inspector general looked at the investigation of the conflict of interest complete and the inspector general looked at the complete of the environmental research mismanagement that prepares the environmental impact statement on the keystone xl on the central conflict. >> guest: it's not a new story. that came out and was thoroughly investigated. my understanding is that there were no conflicts found. what you are starting to see frankly is the recycling of a lot of defense. keep in mind, that executive order that was put in place that governs this entire process was put in place to expedite the cross border transportation facilities. instead of expediting it, this environment environmental impact we could have built the empire state building five times buy now. we have completed world war ii in less time. so again as an institutional list a
they were going to do some things that they previously would never have done. in texas and mississippi, north carolina and florida, groups are already devising creative ways to make it difficult for minorities, each of us, to vote. in texas, they have already done it. this assault on freedom should be taken as seriously as you have taken anything. any changes to our voting process should be enacted to make voices heard. just simply being able to vote. i have asked the senate judiciary committee to examine these dangerous voting suppression efforts and discuss steps the senate can make to preserve the right of every senatorto cast a ballot. leahy is doing that. [applause] on the day the civil rights act was signed into law, president lyndon johnson warned the struggle for equality was not nearly over. here is what he said. "those who founded our country knew that freedom would be secure only if each generation fought." now our generation of americans have been called on to the search of justice. he is sure right. those words are written -- are a reminder to a new generation that freedom
. doesn't that sound like east of the mississippi. the jackpot surging to $448 million. hours before that drawing as millions line up hoping they would be the lucky winners. we will have a live report from one of the locations coming up. >>> let's go to a fox news alert. the manhunt for kidnapping of two children. amber alert in states of oregon and washington. this after the suspect's car was believed to have been spotted heading north. anna kooiman is here. she has the latest details on the story. what do we know this morning? >> this is new overnight. oregon state police saying there was a possible sighting of james dimaggio's nissan and another 15 miles away along the same highway in oregon. >> we are trying to get as many people out there looking for that vehicle with that plate and with the suspect and what we hope are two children in that vehicle. >> dimaggio may be headed to canada. the close family friend is accused of murdering the mother of hannah and ethan anderson and setting the house on fire. police found her body inside along with the remains of a child possibly 8-yea
and mississippi. notice toward the mid-atlantic, the moisture and chance for showers, nothing like the south. either way, the clouds are moving in. heavy rain toward texas. still raining in the southeast. we are talking about the combination bringing eight inches of rain that have been soaked. >> the rain is really stuck there in the southeast. >> this unbelievable amount of rain. this summer, we have seen way over, 10 to 15 inches over. >> how many inches of rain have they seen? >> every place is different but some ten to 15. >> thank you. >>> kind of good news/bad news. it's a deal for the believers convinced we are not alone on the universe. do you believe this? >> yeah. >> the cia is officially acknowledging the existence of super secret area 51. the documents include a map of the location in the nevada desert. would you go, berman? >> mm-hmm. >> you would? >> mm-hmm. >> they said it's a testing sight for surveillance during the cold war. >> you believe that? >> i do. >> if they are not doing the alien autopsies there, where are they doing them? they are doing them somewhere? >> yeah. i'
father and sister said we cannot rest and be satisfied as long as black folk in mississippi could not vote. and those in new york believed that they had nothing for which to vote. today the united states supreme court, having recently eviscerating the voting rights act and with numerous states clamoring to legislatively codify voting suppression measures, not only must we not be satisfied but we must fight back boldly. too many of our unknown heroes and sheroes fought, bled and died for us to have the precious rights of vote. for us to now sit back and timidly allow our franchise to be taken away or diminished, we must not rest until the congress of the united states restores the voting rights act protections discarded by a supreme court blind to the blatant tests of the black folks. paramount to martin luther king jr.'s fervent dream was the commitment that african americans gain full economic opportunity and not be confined to basic mobility forward from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. today, with 12% unemployment rates in the african american community and 38% of all children
and particularly the right to vote to people of color in mississippi. i hadn't -- i didn't know him well but i had covered him on a fairly regular basis. and when he was assassinated in an especially cowardly and despicable way, i was tipped to the shooting and we were the first people covering it, news people at the scene. so i knew medgar and had met his family before. i had met his brother at the airport and we formed a bond which lasts to this day, i'm happy to say. i've always had a bond with medgar's family partly because i know firsthand, i bore witness to how heroic his efforts were to bring freedom and justice in the darkest corners of mississippi at a bad time. by the way, it's little noted nor very often remembered that the march on washington for which dr. king rightly became so famous was originally designed to be primarily a march in memory of medgar evers and what had happened to medgar evers. that got lost in the shuffle of the day as it developed and has been lost in the history and reporting since that time. >> well, dan rather, you have provided so much detail and illumination a
in mississippi during the freedom ride. a bus was set on fire in alabama. we were beaten and arrested and jailed, but we helped bring an end to segregation in public transportation. i came back here again in june of 1963 with the big six as the new chairman of the student nonviolent coordinating committee. we met with president kennedy. in 1963, we could not register to vote simply because of the color of our skin. we had to pay a poll tax, pass a so-called literacy test, and count the number of jelly baean in a jar. hundreds of thousands of people were arrested in the south for trying to participate in the democratic process. medgar evers had been killed in mississippi, and that's why we told president kennedy we intended to march on washington to demonstrate the need for equal justice and equal opportunity in america. on august 28th, 1963, the nation's capital was in a state of emergency. thousands of troops surrounded the city. liquor stores were closed. but the march was so orderly, so peaceful. it was filled with dignity and self-respect because we believed in a way of peace, the way of lov
right. pull out, everybody. i'll let you watch. >> mississippi. 7 mississippi. fail. >> and in fact, the car flips over. >> oh, my gosh. >> can you believe this? the dash camera catches everything. rolls over on its side. and flips. apparently the translation in korean is great. roll it again. we'll just have some fun. but apparently the driving instructor says "brake, brake, brake!" [ bleep ], what do we do? what do we do? as the car starts turning over on its side. right about here. okay. >> oh, oh, oh. >> he says, what are you doing, don't know which gas pedal you are pressing! i'm going crazy! get out of this car! >> i could have done the translation from what she was doing. you can hear her go oh, oh, oh, oh. >> it sounds the same in any language, the expletive. doesn't it? >> oh, oh, oh. >> failed in seven seconds. worst driver ever! >> and over again. >>> here is a video you are going to want to watch. this one is great. group of young youtubers, true story asa team have posted a video of themselves, they usually -- they're pranksters. this time they changed up the tone. this
every hill of mississippi and from every mountainside. let freedom ring, and when it happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and from every state and every city we will be able to speed up the day that all of us black men and white men choose power and we will be able to join hands and sing in the old spirit of free at last, free at last. thank god almighty we are free at last. [applause] >> on a sunday morning in september of 1963, for young black girls attended sunday school at the 16th st. storch church. the bible lesson was a love that for dallas. the girl moved to the basement when suddenly an always went through the church like a cannon. the bomb planted near the basement went through the house of worship. they toppled a gruesome discovery. sandia, age 14, carroll robertson, age 14. addy mae colins and denise age 11 all were found dead, their bodies buried atop one another. >> it's great to be visible all through dallas. >> it will only be a matter of minutes before he arrives at the turnpike. >> they got in the newsroom and as perhaps you
teenager on vacation in mississippi. is it is a new day, but the day isn't over. the struggle for the civil rights for civil rights, social justice, and economic opportunity to man our engagement and our voice. to realize fully our dream we must raise our voices and take action. we must lift our voices to challenge government and our community and neighbors to be better. we must lift our voices for wages that enable families to take care of themselves, for a health care system that erases disparities, for communities and homes without violence, for clean air and water to protect our environment for future generations, and for a just justice system. we must lift our voice for the value of our boat and have our votes counted without interference. as we stand here today, dr. king would know, and john lewis certainly knows, that today is not just a commemoration or celebration. it is a call to action for the work remains undone in the communities that remain unchanged. our foremothers and forefathers 50 years ago closed the books on the last century. well, when the book closes on the 21st centu
understand that we have a lot of partners there joining us. .ost: brookhaven, mississippi republican. i don't like what y'all are doing on this. you are showing pictures and to do all and how kinds of things. i do not think you all should be doing this. stoph y'all would please showing this on tv. terrorists watch tv. i am highly upset. host: go ahead. guest: maybe i can give you can' come for. this is at a 30,000 foot level. there are much more details that go into it than what i can even describe your today. that there is a great deal of security in and around the ports and ports around the country. the federal government is doing a good job. host: all the information is public information? guest: it is. host: at what point does the government come into play? what it is here, who takes over security? host: security is a joint venturer. when it is under water it is mainly coast guard. when it reaches the earth it is port authority and customs. reporting scanning and certain it isners that open it, federally managed. the state portion as to make sure they are secure. republican caller. hi,
in this effort. >> host: republican line, brookhaven, mississippi. >> caller: yeah, this is mary. i don't like what y'all are doing on this. you are showing security staff, showing security staff. you are showing pictures and everything. expected tell them how to get badges and all kinds of things. i don't think john should be doing this. i wish you would please, please telling this on tv. terrorist watch tv. i'm highly upset. >> host: abcaeight. all right. >> guest: maybe i can give you a little bit of comfort. where i have done today is the 30,000-foot level. much, much more detail that goes into it than what i can't even describe today. rest assured that there is a great deal of security in and around the port and ports around the country. the federal government is doing a good job. it does need funding to continue that effort. >> host: of the information you told us i assume is public information. >> guest: it is. >> host: the role of the coast guard and security. at what point did they come into play? and then once the ship is here, who takes over security at that point? >> guest: securit
? guest: it is certainly a valid point. host: let's try charles from mississippi. republican line. hi, there. caller: my question to the lady would be that i noticed during this family vacation with the president's family was gone to martha's vineyard, they left bo the dog at home, and sent a marine helicopter to bring it back at a cost of over $300,000. i would like to know why that is not talked about more. host: more about the president there. guest: i do not know where the facts are coming from, but i find that intriguing, and if that is true, that is certainly something reuters would want to know about and write about. i have a long record in journalism looking into the -- exactly that kind of thing. i will take that note home with me. host: a couple of callers are mentioning the white house, and twitter, the same thing. we have been talking about rules congress wrote for itself for travel. you have a sense of how the white house works in this area -- how he decides where they are going? is anyone oversee those decisions because we are hearing it from callers? guest: i do not kno
separation of the mississippi river basin from the great lakes, hoping against hope to stop the advance of one very aggressive fish, a fish that is just one part of a far bigger problem. our cover story is reported now by mark strassman. >> reporter: meet the king of the illinois river. >> wow. reporter: and a big show-off. mask lar. ... muscular. very muscular. >> reporter: i mean, this thing will hurt you. >> yes, yes. it can jump out of the water at high speeds. they can jump a great distance out of the water, up to eight feet out of the water. >> reporter: fast, easy to startle, and voracious eaters, asian silver carp are a jarring sight here and a hit on youtube tube. but fisheries research scientist greg sass says in the long history of this water way what's also remarkable is when this fish got here. just 20 years ago. >> by the mid 2000's it was becoming a crisis. not only were fish jumping everywhere but what was showing up in our catches, the amount of asian carp versus the native fishes. >> reporter: just amazing how wide it is. with no natural predators in this stretch of th
songs. ?let freedom ring." from stone mountain of georgia, and every hill of mississippi. there was one place that dr. king did not mention, about which he later spoke of. that was the district of columbia. that is because full freedom and democracy were and are still denied to the people who quite literally live within the site of the capitol dome. our city is home to more residents than the state of vermont and wyoming. but we have no voting representative in our own congress. we pay more than $3.5 billion a year in federal taxes. we don't even get the final say over how we spend our own locally raised money. we send our sons and daughters to fight for democracy overseas, but don't get to practice it fully here at home. today, as we remember those who gave so much have a century ago to extend the blessings of liberty to all americans, i implore and hope that all of you will stand with me when i say that we must let freedom ring from mount saint alban, where rises the majestic national cathedral. we must let freedom ring from the bridges of anacostia. we must let freedom ring from capi
secretary of the naacp in mississippi, civil rights leader medgar evers organized voter registration efforts. evers was assassinated in 1963 mere months before the march on washington. since then as a civil rights activist and former executive director of the naacp, his widow myrlie evers williams has carried on his legacy. she joins me sitting rights here, along with joy reid, manager the grio and msnbc contributor. i have been chasing after you, joy. i see you everywhere but here. now i've got you here finally. you are very smart about this stuff. and i know you're from the younger generation. i want to get myrlie on this too. i want you to react to this. a couple of things. it's not just minority voters that benefit from traditional voting patterns. the easier way to vote, younger people have a harder time budgeting their time. they just do for whatever reason. the easier it is to vote, the more are going to vote. african-american voters, many don't have money to have a car, don't have a driver's license, may be older living in row houses like i used to live as a kid, and they basically h
, mississippi. and many may relate to that. the death of those three civil rights workers there. but you also relate the fact that there was many others all across the great state of mississippi and in other southern states who sacrificed as well. and so share some of your opinions on the ideal of galvanizing the college youth. >> we followed the tradition as college students of young people and college students all over the world. when you talk about changing the social order, it is usually the young people, the young, educated people who will generally spear that particular change. -- spearhead that particular change. so we followed that same historical tradition. when, we know about the three civil rights workers who were murdered, but during that same period from june, i think, through september a total of 7 other blacks -- 27 other blacks, young black males, were murdered in mississippi. i related the you the story of two students at alcorn college who were just coming back to the campus from downtown, and two carloads of klansmen kidnapped them, and they found be their bodies, i think,
the opportunity to stand on the deck of a new bridge over the mississippi river, 16 feet board to go. i could watch this go down the nations greatest river. theas an awesome view. people that we serve know that we need to build the next great bridges and maintain the futures that all americans drive on. we're tremendously honored. we want to hear from our first guest here, congressman bill shuster. he oversees house action on all the transportation including maritime, highway, mass transit, and railroad. obeying hiss is ninth congressional district and has searched on the committee since his first election to congress in 2000 one. welcome. >> thank you very much. great examplet that i can take back to washington as to how the parties can work together. we need a good example. i really appreciate the opportunity to be here. at every state i have been to this is my first visit to wisconsin. penn state is going to prevail this year. i look at a couple of other governors. thosek forward to engagements. it is an opportunity for me to engage with governors. have traveled around the country, seeing
fell in areas. gulfport, mississippi, was swamped. flooding forced the first day of school in washington county, florida, to be canceled. san diego mayor bob fillner is expected back at city hall to. he has been out of sight since announcing in july that he would seek therapy cunce announcing in july him of sexual harassment. as carter evans reports, fillner now faces a fight to keep his job. >> hey hey, ho, ho. he has got to go. >> the drive to recall san sand-- san diego mayor bob filner is officially under way. >> our petitions for recall are here. >> on the eve of his return to the city hall. >> what is it going to be like in the workplace when the mayor is back in the hallways? >> it's going to be awkward, and there's going to be some tension. >> reporter: city attorney jan goldsmith says the mayor cannot undo the damage he's already done. and he gave this warning to filner when he does return, behave or else. >> we're to the going to just sit back and let him have the run of city hall without having some protections for our employees. that's our obligation. >> reporte
>>> cierntos de perros pitbull. en texas, alabama, mississippi y georgia. confiscaron 350 canes, algunos malheridos desnutridos se leve yan las costillas. incautaron medio millÓn de dÓlares provenientes de las apuestas relacionadas a las peleas, de ser encontrados culpables, los sospechosos pueden enfrentar penas de 5 aÑos de cÁrcel. la muerte masiva de la costa atlÁntica de estados unidos. han aparecido 500 delfines y se han muerto agonizando ba radivan ya costa de new york. y estos delfines, estaban infectados por un virus parecido al sarampiÓn. y los delfines causa lesiones en la piel infecciones y pulmonÍa. el paro agrÍcola en colombia. un paro que lleva casi mÁs de una semana. >>> y comenzaron las negociaciones en un intento por solucionar la crisis, con agricultores cafeteros y le chers maribel osorio tiene mÁs. >>> bloqueados y en caos, sacudidos por por las protestas de los agricultores que trabajan apero deuda. >>> la producciÓn de leche no da lo que se esperaba, los in zooms son poso aco demasiado costosos para la producciÓn de papa. >>> al cumplirsemen dÍas de par
meaningful progress, we will march through virginia, through mississippi and several other places. do your remember? >> i remember all that. i was donated to the march on washington committee and my task was distributing john's speech, the original speech to member of the press who were seated down below lincoln, still above on the steps. i passed out these copies of john's speech and pointed out to them, that john would be the only speaker speaking that day who talked about black people instead of negroes or colored people as was the fashion. i thought and we thought that this demonstrated how militant we were and how different we were and better and superior we were from the other civil rights organizations. none of the reporters made any objection. [laughter] >> what did you mean by militant? >> i meant aggressive. nothing harmful or violent. i have always been upset by people who say, they are so militant. they equate it with violence. it is not necessarily equatable with violence. it just means somebody is it aggressively in pursuit of his ideas. we thought we were more militant than
: next call comes from stark phill mississippi. >> host: please go ahead. >> caller: in 97i was in middle school in mississippi and from the gif corporation dr. carson came to talk to the students at the school and i wanted to know was he making a national tour to visit the different schools because we also had to read his books and write reports. i want to know was he planning on making vose? >> host: what did you think of dr. carson's visit when you were in middle school? >> caller: this is the reason i'm calling. one of the things that stuck out to me in his book is he said he had an ander management problem. and so in my town, that's one of the things with the young people that is on the rise, a lot of armed robberies and rising murders and so he decided he found a way to channel that energy into a directed effort and so i wanted to know -- that's what got me in this book. but it was in '97, '98. i wanted to know can he bring that energy fishback? >> host: can you tell let him personally as well? >> guest: i will. thank you so much. i've been actually traveling around the country givi
mississippi. that is not good news for >>> over the weekend. manuel bojorquez is in gulf port, mississippi. manuel good morning to you. >> . >> reporter: good morning to our viewers out west. the threat remains to the florida panhandle. with the ground saturated, residents are keeping a watchful eye on the gulf. they are concerned about what a tropical storm or hurricane this season could mean. like much of the southeast, gulf port has been pounded by record rainfall, getting nearly 5 inches in 2 hours at one point. that caught people off guard. twenty-two streets here were flooded. downtown businesses are cleaning up from as much as 18 inches of water now, of course, gulf port and the gulf coast are no strangers to heavy rainfall; but residents here say the recent storms flooded parts of the city that didn't flood during hurricane katrina back in 2005. charlie and gale? . >> manuel thanks. >> if police officers arrest you, do they have the right to search your smartphone. the obama administration believes the answer is yes. however two federal courts disagree. now the white house wants t
and jailed in mississippi during the freedom ride. our bus was set on four in alabama. we were beaten and arrested and jailed. but we helped bring an end to segregation in public transportation. i came back here again in june of 1963 with the big six as the new chairman of the student nonviolent coordinating committee. we met with president kennedy. in 1963 -- we had to pay a poll tax, pass a so-called literacy test. count the number of jelly beans in a jar. hundreds of thousands of people were arrested and jailed throughout the south in trying to participate in the democratic process. that's why we told president kennedy we intended to march on washington. to demonstrate the need for equal justice and equal opportunity in america. on august 28th, 1963, the nation's capital was in a state of emergency. thousands of troops surrounded the city. liquor stores were closed. residents were told to stay home that day. but the march was so orderly, so peaceful. it was filled with dignity and self-respect. because we believe in the way of peace, the way of love, the way of nonviolence. people
the plains. in the southeast more of that in mississippi, alabama, georgia and north florida. 91 in orlando on monday. tuesday, still similar for the southeast. that's where we stay unsettled. wake up with al weekdays at 5:30. what do you think about caffeine? we consume over two billion cups of coffee every week without a second thought. 5-hour energy has less caffeine than some starbucks coffees, plus it has vitamins and nutrients. it's simple... caffeine with vitamins and nutrients. it's the combination that makes it so great. before you make a decision, get the facts. try a sip and find out why so many people love 5-hour energy. laura's being healthy and chewing her multivitamin. with one a day vitacraves for women. it's a great-tasting gummy multivitamin designed for women with more calcium and vitamin d. it's gummies for grown-ups. one-a-day vitacraves for women. >>> all right. you may recall earlier this week kathie lee was brave enough -- no, you were brave enough. >> proud enough! >> brave to show up -- >> shorts i'm embarrassed by. >> this is a photo of her fanny pack outside of r
on the southern mississippi valley. the northeast, is the beautiful spot. temperatures staying below normal. more rain in the forecast by the end of the week. >> we need you to settle something for us. >> gustnado's are real? they don't have to involve sharks? >> always sharks. >>> scary moments for fire crews in boise, idaho running away from a house on fire. look at this just before the collapse. 55 firefighters on the scene battling a three-alarm blaze. they realized something was wrong. radioed for colleagues to get back. they did. >> oh, my goodness. look at that collapse. terrible. >> minor injuries. >> before we move on, it's great to have you back. >> you miss me hitting you, right? beating on you. >> fully recovered. >> i love being back. i showed pictures on twitter. i had a fabulous surprise this morning. it's amazing. >> don't go away, ever again. >> so sweet. you have a big heart. >> 11 minutes past the hour. is student viciously attacked on a bus. the driver, watching the brawl from the front of the bus. should he have stopped the fight. you are going to hear why he didn't, coming u
. this is during a routine dive in mississippi. this is a 66-year-old who was doing a tandem dive. the student is in critical condition with broken bones and a head injury. the owner said the instructor cut away his main parachute and used backup but it's not clear what went wrong. the faa is investigating this along with local authorities. >>> a man who saw a car mow down 13 pedestrians, this is on l.a.'s venice beach. the driver was looking for blood. >> reporter: you see the suspect's car plowing in and swerving around barriers. >> the just drove and took that barrier down and bodies were scattering and flying in the air and people were screaming and it was absolute mayhem. >> reporter: a second camera angle shows the driver getting out casing the boardwalk. ghets back in and floors it. >> he has to have pressed foot to the gas because tires started screeching. he was looking for blood. that guy's intention was to kill people. >> reporter: an italian tourist on her honeymoon was killed and 11 others injured in a scene a quarter mile long. the suspect is nathan campbell of los angeles. just
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